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For my Phoenix Comicon panel: HP House Scarves Pattern

26 May

I know what you’re thinking – yeah, that’s all we need, yet another pattern. Aren’t there a billion of them already? Yes, yes there are, and they all conflict.

Most long-time Potter crafters consider Lauren Kent’s 2003/2004 patterns to be the definitive pattern, but Atypically Knit has been offline for a very long time. The patterns themselves survive on the Leaky Cauldron site, but not the extensive notes before and after the patterns, which include width & length measurements, as well as about how wide the stripes should be, which are important if you’re using a different yarn or needle size – and since the yarn she used is now discontinued, we all are! Her Ravelry page mentions that they’re in the book Charmed Knits, but I’ve never read it, so I don’t know how thorough they are in there.

And fortunately she did list those sizes, because my gauge is a lot different than hers – so my row count is different as well. If you’re doing a scarf for the first movie and your stripe is just over 3″ but your number of rows are different than what’s listed here, make a note of it and change colors!

(I’m also just noticing that this is only the third post I’ve done since the last Phoenix Comicon – I didn’t blog at all about Keen Halloween! I guess since I post a lot on Facebook, I just forget about this place, lol)

However, this actually IS a brand-new pattern. I found an HP bookmark that was knit using the double-sided knit technique, and I liked it so much that I went in search of a pattern for a full-sized double-sided scarf. There were none! Just the regular knit in the round tubes.

I also decided that it was way past time that the stripe patterns for both versions should be in the same place. Right?

Getting the right colors is a huge job as well. Using the lists from several different websites plus all the experimentation I’ve done myself over the years, I know have a fairly comprehensive list. The scarf colors in the first two movies are much brighter and cheerier than in all the clothes starting with PoA, which makes sense because the mood of the whole series takes a turn for the dark at that point. Or “moody” as Kent put it, which is also fitting.

Gryffindor:
(SS/CoS) Main color (MC): Red Heart Classic Cardinal #917,
Secondary color (SC): Red Heart Classic Golden Yellow #1270
(PoA+) MC: Red Heart Super Saver Burgundy #376, SC: Red Heart SS Gold #321

Ravenclaw: (all the rest of the yarns are RH Super Saver)
– Book- MC: Blue #886, SC: Pumpkin #254
– Movie- (SS/CoA) MC: Soft Navy #387, SC: Light Gray #41
(PoA+) MC: Windsor Blue #380, SC: Light Gray #41

Hufflepuff:
(SS/CoS) MC: Bright Yellow #324, SC: Black #312
(PoA+) MC: Gold #321, SC: Black #312

Slytherin:
(SS/CoS) MC: Paddy Green #368 , SC: Light Gray #41
(PoA+) MC: Hunter Green #389, SC: Light Gray #41

Ilvermorny
MC: Blue #886, SC: Burgundy #376

 

 

If you look around at cosplay pics & shops, people mostly use the PoA colors no matter which stripe pattern. It’s what we spent most of the movies looking at, and there are fans out there crafting that weren’t alive when there were no movies at all, just color illustrations of the House crests. It’s your costume/cosplay, you pick what you like!

Before we get to the actual patterns, here are the measurements:
SS/CoA – about 65-70″ long and about 7-8″ wide
Stripes a bit more than 3″ long

PoA+ Scarf should be about 9″ wide and possibly 85″ long
No measurements on the width of the stripes, so I just stuck with the number of rows. There are only three, and it doesn’t appear to make much of a difference in my example.

Here’s my gauge. I usually suggest doing a swatch in the stitch pattern at least 10 sts by 10 rows, just to see how close yours matches up. You don’t necessarily have to make any pattern adjustments right away, it’s just something to be aware of as you go.

Three (visible on one side) sts per inch
Four (visible) rows per inch

That “visible” thing will make sense later, trust me. 😉

And now, we knit!

 

Wizarding World School Scarf Patterns

 

Needed:

Worsted weight yarn in two colors of your choice; the main color (MC) and the secondary color (SC)
Knitting needles, size 8 (5.00 mm)
Yarn needle for weaving in ends.

Abreviations:
St(s) = stitch(es)
Sl st = slip stitch
Sl st Purl-wise = Insert needle into st as if to purl; without yarning over, move the st from the left needle to the right

Original Movie Design Color Blocks

Used in the movies “Sorcerer’s Stone” and “Chamber of Secrets”

Cast on 48 sts with MC

Row 1: Knit 1, *knit 1, sl st purl-wise*, repeat to the last st in row, knit 1.
Row 2: Sl st, *knit 1, sl st purl-wise*, repeat to the last st in row, knit 1.

Repeat Row 2 for a total of 26 rows (13 “rounds”)

You are basically knitting half the stitches in the row on one pass, then turning the work and knitting the stitches that you slipped before. Two rows equals one “round”.  Always change colors on the side that your cast-on “tail” is at (or use a stitch marker) so that your stripes are even.

I’m not good at counting rows as I go. I own row counters, but I forget to change the numbers and so I end up having to count them on the work anyway. In double-sided knitting, you’ll be able to see half the number of rows on each side. So, if you’ve knit 26 rows, you be able to look at either side, and when you count the rows, you’ll see 13. That’s why I refer to them as rounds … you’re still knitting a tube, but one with nice, defined sl st edges, and ends that you don’t have to sew shut. No need to worry about twisting the scarf as you’re doing the finishing!

Row 27: Change to SC. Continue to repeat Row 2, changing colors every 26 rows/13 rounds, until you have 19 stripes; 10 MC and 9 SC, beginning and ending with MC. Bind off.

Finishing: Weave in yarn ends. For fringe, you’ll have eleven tassels: six MC and five SC, again with MC fringe on both edges.
Tassel: Take 7 pieces of yarn and while holding them all together, fold them in half . Push the crochet hook through both thicknesses of scarf in the first row of knitting at one end, loop the folded ends of the yarn around the hook, and pull the yarn loops halfway through. Using the hook or your fingers, pull the cut yarn ends through the loop end, then tighten the tassel. I find it’s easier to do the middle SC tassel first, then the MC end tassels, and eye the rest.
After attaching all the tassels, lay end of scarf flat, and trim the edges of the fringe so it is even.

And that’s it! Now you’re showing your true colors!

OK, and now for the other stripe pattern.

 

Trapped Bar Stripe Design Pattern

Used in the rest of the Harry Potter movies starting with “Prisoner of Azkaban”

Cast on 56 sts with MC

Row 1: Knit 1, *knit 1, sl st purl-wise*, repeat to the last st in row, knit 1.
Row 2: Sl st, *knit 1, sl st purl-wise*, repeat to the last st in row, knit 1.

Repeat Row 2 for a total of 50 rows/25 “rounds” (until you can count 25 rows on a side)

[for a more complete explanation of the knitting, see first scarf instructions]

Change to SC. Follow this striping pattern:
–  6 rows/ 3 rounds of SC
–  10 rows / 5 rounds of MC
–  6 rows/ 3 rounds of SC

Change back to MC, knit another 25 rounds. Repeat stripes for a total of 14 trapped bars. Bind off.

Finishing: Weave in all ends. Add fringe.
cut approximately 120 8″ pieces of MC yarn. Take 3 pieces of yarn and while holding them all together, fold them in half . Push the crochet hook through both thicknesses of scarf in the first row of knitting at one end, loop the folded ends of the yarn around the hook, and pull the yarn loops halfway through. Using the hook or your fingers, pull the cut yarn ends through the loop end, then tighten the tassel. Place one every two stitches across the both ends of the scarf.
After attaching all the tassels, lay end of scarf flat, and trim the edges of the fringe so it is even.

 

There you go! I’m showing scarf swatches at the convention panel; I’ll upload pictures for the rest of you when I get the scarves finished.

 

 

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Repeat Customers Are Amazing!

24 Jul

So, I’m busy gearing up for Keen Halloween, and I get a message from a customer. “Oh no,” I wonder, always thinking the worst, “did the pompom fall apart?” As I was clicking to read, I was already calculating in my head if I had the yarn left to fix it (I do that for people).

But no – she wanted to buy more hats! It was the lady who saw the Martha tam at Phoenix Comicon, and then contacted me through my Etsy store to see if I’d sold it yet. I had not, so it was hers! She didn’t even realize that it was a cosplay piece, she just loved the hat.

So now, some lucky person is going to get one (in a different color) as a gift! And her child absolutely needs a Rainbow Dash hat, and who am I to refuse such a request. 🙂

If you want to make one yourself, the pattern is listed for free on the Midnight Designs site (there’s also a link to the pattern on her Ravelry). I used the Wool-ease yarn and hook size suggested, and it’s so soft and gorgeous. You definitely don’t need to be a Doctor Who fan to love it!

martha-tam

Of course, this means I have to put my skulls on hold for a bit, but I promise to post them as soon as I can.

 

 

Breakfast on Your Head

24 Jun

DONE with Phoenix Comicon, finally. I love helping plans come together, but I don’t get much else done when I do, lol. While relaxing, I found this AWESOME pattern online for a bacon scarf. Instead of a flat ripple, it was all “curly” like real bacon! I was in love. Then a friend said “Now all you need  is a fried egg hat.” My friends are geniuses.

 

Bacon 'n eggs 'n croissant - ON YOUR HEAD!

Bacon ‘n eggs ‘n croissant – ON YOUR HEAD!

 

Since the scarf pattern was free on the internet, I think it’s only fair that the hat is, too. If you’ve ever crocheted a hdc hat before, this will be very, very familiar to you. 🙂

For the hat, I used Caron One Pound in Sunflower and White, and for the scarf I used Vanna’s Choice in Brick and Sand.

Fried Egg Hat

You’ll need:
Sz J (6 mm)  & sz H (5 mm) hooks, worsted weight yarn in egg yellow and off white/aran

Hat is worked in a spiral. If you prefer to join each round, start the next with a ch 1

With J hook:
Round 1: 8 hdc in adjustable loop [8 sts]
R2: 2 hdc in each st around [16 sts]
R3: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in the next st) 8x. [24 sts]
R4: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 2 sts) 8x. [32 sts]
R5: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 3 sts) 8x.  [40 sts]
R6: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 4 sts) 8x. [48 sts]
R7: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 5 sts) 8x. [56 sts]
R8: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 6 sts) 8x. [64 sts]
R9: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 7sts) 2x, 1 hdc in each remaining st around [66]
R10: 1 hdc in each st around [66]
R11-R15: repeat R10 [66]

Switch to sz H (5 mm) hook and white yarn

R16: Working in FLO,  hdc in ea st around.
R17: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 7 sts) 8x, hdc in ea of two remaining sts. [74 sts]
R18: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 8 sts) 8x, hdc in ea of two remaining sts. [82 sts]
R19: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 9 sts) 8x, hdc in ea of two remaining sts. [ sts]
R20: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 10 sts) 8x, hdc in ea of two remaining sts. [ sts]
R21: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 11 sts) 8x, hdc in ea of two remaining sts. [ sts]
R22: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 12 sts) 8x, hdc in ea of two remaining sts. [ sts]
R23: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 13 sts) 8x, hdc in ea of two remaining sts. [ sts]
R24: *Skip 2 sts, 6 dc in next st, sk 2 sts, sc in next st*, repeat around.
R25: Work a row of crab stitch (reverse single crochet) around, fasten off.

Croissant

Ch 29
Row 1-10: sc across, ch 1, turn (28)
Row 18: dec, sc in next 24, dec, ch 1, turn (26)
Rows 19-21: sc across, ch 1, turn (26)
Row 22: dec, sc in next 22, dec, ch 1, turn (24)
Rows 23-25: sc across, ch 1, turn (24)
Row 26: dec, sc in next 20, dec, ch 1, turn (22)
Rows 27-29: sc across, ch 1, turn (22)
Row 30: dec, sc in next 18, dec, ch 1, turn (20)
Row 31-33: sc across, ch 1, turn (20)
Row 34: dec, sc in next 16, dec, ch 1, turn (18)
Rows 35-37: sc across, ch 1, ch 1, turn (18)
Row 38: dec, sc in next 14, dec, ch 1, turn (16)
Rows 39- 41: sc across, ch 1, turn (16)
Row 42: dec, sc in next 12, dec, ch 1, turn (14)
Rows 43-45: sc across, ch 1, turn (14)
Row 46: dec, sc in next 10, dec, ch 1, turn (12)
Rows 47-49: sc across, ch 1, turn (12)
Row 50: dec, sc in next 8, dec, ch 1, turn (10)
Rows 51-53: sc across, ch 1, turn (10)
Row 54: dec, sc in next 6, dec, ch 1, turn (8)
Rows 55-57: sc across, ch 1, turn (8)
Row 58: dec, sc in next 4, dec, ch 1, turn (6)
Rows 59-61: sc across, ch 1, turn (6)
Row 62: dec, sc in next 2, dec, ch 1, turn (4)
Rows 63-65: sc across, ch 1, turn (4)
Row 66: dec across, ch 1, turn (2)
Row 67: sc across (2)

FO and weave in ends; leave thread on tip to sew down.

To keep it’s shape, you could roll it up around a pipe cleaner or floral wire. I didn’t because I was sewing the edges to a pat of “butter”. Start from the widest end and roll up; secure with a yarn needle or pin while you sew up the tip. Or glue it, whatever, it’s your food!

Butter:

Ch 6

Rows 1-12: Sc 5 across, ch 1, turn

Fold in half, sl st around all four edges

 

You don’t have to sew them together exactly the way I did, have fun with it. Now all your vegan friends can have bacon as well!

 

Adorable Little Shamrock

12 Mar

I saved these instructions in a text file – not sure from where, or when. Time to finally try it out!

Crochet Shamrock

Sorry for the over-flash, Photoshop could only take out so much. I didn’t feel like getting up, so I just put some copy paper on my lap, and held the camera over the shamrock. You can definitely see how cute it is, though. 🙂

I thought I should start writing charts, too. I find a lot of foreign patterns online and if I learned to follow charts, I could make them. You can make the shapes in Illustrator and make your own charts, or you can get chart software. Here’s my first attempt, using Crochet Charts from Stitch Works Software.

Shamrock Chart

I didn’t actually read the instructions or anything, so I’m sure that I could have made it a lot better. I moved the stem out from the row to make it easier to see the second row of stitches. I’m just noticing I don’t have any little indicator arrows letting you know which direction to go! Dang! Oh well, I only have the demo copy anyway; once I can afford to register it, I’ll get fancier.

Here’s the written instructions for you:

Shamrock:
Leaves:
Row 1: Make a magic circle (also called an adjustable ring), ch1, 7 hdc in ring, pull ring tight, join with sl st in top of 1st hdc.
Row 2: * [Ch2, 2tr, dc, 2tr, ch2, sl st] in same st, skip next st, sl st in next st*. Repeat between ** 2 more times; do not turn.
Stem:
Ch6, sc in 3rd ch from hook, sl st in each remaining st, join with sl st to bottom of shamrock.  Fasten off.

Finger Ninjas

11 Jan

I’ve been neglecting you, sorry!

I’ll post the holiday presents I made as soon as I find my camera again.

In the meantime, here’s a quick project I made for a friend. He saw this picture of ninja finger puppets on Deviant Art, and it looked easy, so I got to it! Of course, I ended up ripping it out & starting over far more times than I thought I would, just like every other project ever, lol.

Finger Ninjas

CUTE, RIGHT?

I wrote down the pattern in case other people wanted them – and I know you do, so here it is!

I used Red Heart Super Saver, which is a worsted weight (4 – medium on the standard yarn weight chart), and a size F (3.75 mm) hook.
Instructions are in US terms.

Start w/magic circle, chain 2, 9 dc (double crochet) in circle. Join w/a slip st into 2nd beginning chain.

Next round: Ch 2, dc in ea of next 7 dc, ch 2, join w/a sl st into 2nd beg ch.

Next round: Ch 2, Dc in ea of next 7 dc, 2 dc in ch 2 space, join w/ sl st in 2nd beg ch, finish off.
Go forth now and attack, my minions!

Whether you call it Veteran’s Day or Remembrance Day…

11 Nov Rememberance Day poppy

In 1918, in World War I, hostilities formally ended “at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month,” in accordance with the Armistice. The next year, King George V dedicated a day of remembrance for the members of the armed forces who lost their lives.

Red poppies bloomed over some of the worst battlefields in Flanders after the war, and many Commonwealth and former Commonwealth countries wear Remembrance Poppies on that day. In Australia and New Zealand, ANZAC Day in April is their main day of remembrance, commemorating the heart-rending Battle of Gallipoli (in Turkey), where poppies are also worn. It’s mainly due to the poem “In Flanders Field”, which I’ll copy at the end of the post.

Rememberance Day poppy

“In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row”

The poppy also grows wild here in the Western US – it might in other states as well, but here’s where I’m familiar with, lol. The Arizona poppy is actually yellow, because we just gotta be different. The blood-red poppy is the one we use to remember.

I crochet mine. Here’s a link to another blog with paper, knit, and sewn felt ones as well.

I used red & black worsted weight yarn with a size F hook. You can use whatever you like, gauge is not important. You can make a tiny poppy with crochet thread, or a bigger one using a bigger hook.

(crochet terms are US, for UK/Australia terms, see here for the pattern that I adapted mine from)

Veteran’s Day Remembrance Poppy Pin

With black yarn, make a “magic circle”. Ch 1, sc 14 stitches into circle, slip st into ch (15 st). Pull circle tight to close up the center of the flower, change to red yarn.

Veterans Remembrance Poppy

Crochet a poppy in remembrance of all of our fallen troops

Ch 1, sc in 1st st, * (over the next 3 scs) 2 dc in each of the next two sts, sc *, repeat three more times. 2 dc in each of the next 2 sts, sl st into beginning ch.

(In the original pattern, she typed “4 dc” in each st, which makes a fuller, very pretty flower; it doesn’t match the picture she posted or any of the Remembrance/Anzac poppies people wear. I show both in my pic. If you want to make an all-occasion poppy, just substitute 4 for 2 whenever you dc)

Fasten off. Weave in ends, sew or glue a safety pin or brooch/pin back to flower.

IN FLANDERS FIELDS
-Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae
In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead.
Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

The Ultimate “Jayne Hat” pattern

24 Oct

OK, yes – I am a HUGE fan of the show “Firefly” and the sequel movie “Serenity”! I’m involved with the Arizona Browncoats group, and got a message from them to see if I would be interested in making some Jayne hats to raise money for the annual Can’t Stop the Serenity charity event. Of course!

They asked if I had a pattern, but I asked them to give me the same one the others were knitting with for consistency.

After my first one, I looked at it and thought “Wait. That orange bit looks WAY too wide.” I did an image search – EVERYONE’S looked like that!

What the heck? The pattern they gave me said to knit in orange for 4″. When I tried the one I made on, it looked just like the fan version here (and everywhere else on the internet).

I did a search for patterns & found a LOT, but they all said to knit 4″ of orange, and a few comments from people saying that it was too wide and re-made it with less orange. I wondered where they got that 4″ measurement from?

I looked at the screenshot pic, and thought that the orange stripe in the official hat looks like it’s the same length as Adam Baldwin’s nose. Zooming in and using a ruler I confirmed that that was true. I then measured my nose (I’m 5′ 2″) and got 2″. I messaged a large male friend (6′ 5″), and confirmed that his nose was indeed 4″. My roommate is just over 6′, however, and his nose was 2 1/2″!

My roommate wanted a hat, so I made his with a 3″ orange stripe. It looks good on him, but I thought it still didn’t look right. For my Etsy store, I make them with a 2″ orange stripe, with the total hat( before decreasing) still at 7″.  Maybe you could measure your nose & go with that, lol.

What I was going for was the LOOK, rather than “what are the dimensions of the original?” Like my first drawing teacher said, “Don’t recreate what’s there, that’s what photographs are for. Make it BEAUTIFUL.”

(Edit: Yes, I do sell them in my Etsy store here.)

And now you want to make one as well, right? Of course! Here’s the pattern, with my adjustments.

Jayne Cobb Hat Pattern

Materials:

Yarn: “Bulky” or doubled worsted weight, ½ skein orange, ½ skein yellow, ½ skein rust red (aprox 100 yards ea) of bulky, or 1 skein ea of worsted.
I used Lion brand Wool-ease in Gold, Paprika and Chili (2 strands)
[edit 2-20-2014: Lion discontinued Chili, so now I use one strand of Wool-Ease Chestnut Heather and one strand of Bernat Super Value Redwood Heather]
Needles: 16” circular size 10 and 1 set double-pointed size 10
Tapestry needle for weaving in ends

Gauge: 4 st & 4 rows = 1” (or thereabouts) using bulky weight yarn

Techniques you’ll use: Casting on (CO), knit stitch, purl stitch, knitting in the round, basic decrease (knit 2 together [k2tog] and slip slip knit [ssk]), binding off, picking up stitches, weaving in ends, making a pompom.

Sized for a 24” head unstretched (stretches about 4″). For a larger or smaller hat, adjust the number of cast-on stitches in increments of 8.

Body of hat:

Using orange, CO 80. Being careful not to twist stitches, join and place marker to indicate the beginning of the row.

Work k1p1 ribbing for two rows.

Still using orange, knit in stockinette st (knit all) until hat measures 2-3 inches.

At the end of the round, switch to yellow and knit ’til the whole hat is 7 inches.

Decrease:

Round 1: K2tog over entire row, switching to double-pointed needles when hat becomes too small to work on circular. (40 st remaining)

Round 2: Knit all

Round 3: K2tog (20 st remaining)

Round 4: Knit all

Rounds 5 & 6: K2tog. (5 st remain)

Cut yarn, leaving a 6” tail, and draw through remaining stitches to cinch up the top.

Earflaps:

Using rust red, Pick up and knit the 20 stitches along the cast-on edge (you’ll be working in stockinette st).

Row 2: Slip the first stitch and purl to the end.

Row 3: Slip the first stitch and knit to the end.

Repeat rows 2 & 3 until flap measures 2 ½”. (10 rows in bulky)

Row 11: Slip 1, knit 1, ssk, knit to 4 stitches before the end, k2tog, knit 2.

Row 12: Slip the first st and purl to the end.

Repeat rows 11 & 12 until you have 6 sts remaining, ending on a purl row.

Next row: Slip 1, knit 1, ssk, knit to end.

Wrong-side row: Slip the first st and purl to the end.

Repeat these two rows until 3 sts remain. Bind off, leaving a 6” tail.

Repeat with other side of hat.

Pompom:

I made mine with a pom-pom maker from the store. I used the larger size (the package came with two), and wound three layers of yarn, making it VERY thick, which everyone loves. The first layer is wound with three strands of yarn, one of each color. Then I go back over it with just the orange & red, and then a third layer with just the red. At this point, when I close up the pom-pom maker, there’s almost no free “air” in the middle of the circle.

If you don’t have one, here’s a set of directions I found in another one of the free patterns online:

“If you know how to make a pom-pom, skip these directions. Make a pompom about four inches in diameter with a little bit of yellow, some orange, and a lot of rust red and attach it to the hat.

In a nutshell, cut two circles out of cardboard, each about 3 ½ inches in diameter. Make a hole in the middle of both about ¾ of an inch in diameter. (This isn’t precise. I stuck my scissors in the middle and wiggled them around until it looked about right.) Cut a length about the size of your arm of all three colors and thread them onto a tapestry needle. Push the needle through the hole and begin wrapping around the outside, so that you’re covering the cardboard part. When that yarn is gone, cut a length of orange and rust red and repeat. Then cut a length of rust red and repeat. Keep wrapping until you can’t get any more yarn through the middle of the hole in the cardboard.

Take your scissors and cut around the outside of the cardboard circle. Separate the circles just a bit. You’ll see that you have a little bundle of yarn, with the individual pieces all lined up. Take a length of yellow yarn and tie it firmly around the middle part. Remove the cardboard. Tie the pom-pom firmly to the hat. You may want to use a tapestry needle and loop it around more than once so the pom-pom isn’t floppy. Fluff up the pom-pom.”

Finishing:

Sew the pompom to the top of the hat securely, using any color yarn (I use a long strand to tie the pom-pom while making it, and then use those ends to secure to the hat)

Weave in any loose ends, except the ones at the end of the earflaps. Cut another length of rust/red yarn about 12″, thread through the earflap and pull half-way through, knot together right at the edge of the earflap with the tail you had left after binding off. Repeat with other side.

Remember, Ma Cobb isn’t worrying about the odd bit sticking out here and there, so you’ve got some leeway if your hat doesn’t look perfect.

Congratulations! You have a cunning hat!

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